Spices increase farmers’ income

A field of ginger in the village of Uttara Shoshi in the upazila sadar of the Nilphamari district. Farmers put more land into growing spices, because growing them is more profitable than growing crops such as rice, wheat and jute. EAM ASADUZZAMAN

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A field of ginger in the village of Uttara Shoshi in the upazila sadar of the Nilphamari district. Farmers put more land into growing spices, because growing them is more profitable than growing crops such as rice, wheat and jute. EAM ASADUZZAMAN

The cultivation of spices has improved the incomes of Nilphamari farmers through their higher yield and higher prices, helping the producers to overcome the losses they suffered in previous years by producing traditional crops such as rice, wheat. and jute.

Popular varieties of spices preferred by farmers and adapted to the northern district soil are ginger, turmeric, onion, garlic, peeper, coriander seed, and cassia leaf.

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According to the Nilphamari Agricultural Extension Department (DAE), the goal is to cultivate 12,200 tonnes of ginger, 5,500 tonnes of turmeric, 7,500 tonnes of onion, 14,000 tonnes of garlic, 2,000 tonnes of chilli and 5,000 tonnes of other spices. This year.

The area cultivated in spices was 4,200 hectares in 2016 and it increased to 6,620 hectares this year as farmers turned to spices thanks to their bright economic outlook.

Khatizar Rahman, a 64-year-old farmer from Uttara Shoshi village in sadar upazila, had grown aman and boro rice for years but rarely made a profit.

He has been growing ginger for two years in a row and has raked in good profits.

This year he grew ginger on 11 bighas and hopes to get 15 tons of yield. Harvesting can give him an income of 6.5 lakh Tk at the current market price of the spice against the cost of production of 2 lakh Tk.

“Seeing my success, farmers in many neighboring areas started to cultivate it,” Rahman said.

This is because the cultivation of spices brings higher income.

For example, a harvest of aman and boro together will yield a profit of 30,000 to 35,000 Tk per bigha, while ginger can yield 60,000 to 65,000 Tk on the same area, according to Anwarul Islam, agricultural non-commissioned officer. assistant to Kishorganj upazila. .

Another popular spice which is cultivated is turmeric which is an essential ingredient used in cooking because it is less labor intensive and cost less, but brings a lucrative profit.

For better color and flavor, local turmeric is in great demand. For example, companies set up makeshift centers during harvest to source the spice directly from farmers.

The price of onion and garlic is rising almost every year, making many farmers rich overnight, the growers said.

Bhanu Chandra Roy, a 50-year-old farmer from Dhobadanga village in Sadar Upazila, now grows onion and garlic.

He hopes to receive 400 maunds of onions from 10 earth bighas and 100 maunds of garlic from three bighas while he has grown them in mid-November. He will harvest the crops in March and April.

He plans to build a house out of bricks after selling them.

“A favorable soil and climate and good prices make farmers enthusiastic about growing spices,” said Md Rafiqul Islam, agricultural extension agent in sadar upazila.

The government has launched a project to encourage farmers to grow pulses and spices, according to Abu Bakkar Siddique, deputy director of DAE in Nilphamari.


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Freeda S. Scott